Tag: art

Twin Twin Peaks: mobile doubles

Mimsy October 23, 2018

A few years ago, I watched the original Twin Peaks series. I became obsessed with photographing and filming the television screen in ways that incorporated the reflection of what I was filming into the scene that I was filming. I’m gradually posting the photographs and gifs I made at that time.

Image description: a photograph of a television screen showing a scene from "Twin Peaks." The scene shows a closeup of the character Audrey Horne's face. She is lying on a pink floral sofa with her eyes closed. A man's hand is brushing against her cheek. The image contains a reflection of a mobile phone which is displaying the same scene as photographed from the TV screen. The reflected phone image is situated to the right of Audrey's cheek, overlaying the palm of the man's hand.

Image description: a photograph of a television screen showing a scene from “Twin Peaks.” The scene shows a closeup of the character Audrey Horne’s face. She is lying on a pink floral sofa with her eyes closed. A man’s hand is brushing against her cheek. The image contains a reflection of a mobile phone which is displaying the same scene as the one that is currently being described. The reflected phone image is situated to the right of Audrey’s cheek, overlaying the palm of the man’s hand.

Image description: a photograph of a television screen showing a scene from twin peaks. The scene is a closeup of the character Donna's head and shoulders. Donna is standing up and facing the camera. She wears a pale blue top and dark brown jacket. She is holding a pink flower at the left side of the image. A reflection of a mobile phone screen is present in the image to the right of Donna's jawline. The reflected screen displays the same image as the one that is being photographed from the TV screen.

Image description: a photograph of a television screen showing a scene from “Twin Peaks.” The scene is a closeup of the character Donna’s head and shoulders. Donna is standing up and facing the camera. She wears a pale blue top and dark brown jacket. She is holding a pink flower at the left side of the image. A reflection of a mobile phone screen is present in the image to the right of Donna’s jawline. The reflected screen displays the same image as the one that is currently being described.

Image description: a photograph of a television screen showing a scene from "Twin Peaks." The scene shows either the character Donna or the character Audrey in profile at the right of the image. Donna or Audrey is facing towards the left. She is resting her hand on a pink wall and is looking at a set of two dimmer light switches. Also present in the image is a reflection of a mobile phone screen. The screen reflection is situated between Donna or Audrey's hand and the dimmer switches. The reflection shows the same scene as the one that is currently being described.

Image description: a photograph of a television screen showing a scene from “Twin Peaks.” The scene shows either the character Donna or the character Audrey in profile at the right of the image. Donna or Audrey is facing towards the left. She is resting her hand on a pink wall and is looking at a set of two dimmer light switches. Also present in the image is a reflection of a mobile phone screen. The screen reflection is situated between Donna or Audrey’s hand and the dimmer switches. The reflection shows the same scene as the one that is currently being described.

A SOUND BARRIER

Sensory Integration October 2, 2018

I wrote this essay in February 2017, as part of an artist residency at Testing Grounds, with While the Hour arts collective. My project for this residency involved an attempt to discern and notate the cacophony of nonhuman sounds I heard in that place.

TESTING GROUNDS

The traffic noise here is more or less constant. The site is in the centre of the city, where peak hour lasts all day. The noise is not altogether uniform – there are discernible, wave-like patterns in the volume. This variation could perhaps be explained by the surrounding traffic-light cycles, which compress and release the vehicular flow, creating intersecting formations that sometimes amplify and other times obliterate each other. Still, the frequency of these waves causes an overall effect of constant, unchanging noise – a dusty and supernaturally turbulent ocean beach.

When I take the traffic sounds as my point of focus, I begin to feel as though time has stopped. The consistency of the wave across the day dampens the feeling of time’s motion. Time has frozen, yet the traffic keeps inexplicably passing. I know, intellectually, that I am hearing an effect of constant change, but I feel, bodily, the solidness, the dependability – the soundness – of the sound.

I feel the soundness of the sound, but I feel it via an unsoundness of my body. I notice a turbulence in my chest and gut, an agitated rolling and juddering across my skin. I suddenly feel a desire to lie on the ground or prop myself up against a wall. I’m looking for a sounder body to lean on, to brace myself against the intangible body of the noise.

WHALES

Whales can see barely 20 metres ahead in the water, but can hear a wave crashing on the shore from thousands of kilometres away. They use their voices to communicate, and they use their finely developed echolocation abilities to find prey and to understand the contours of their environment. Where a human’s consciousness and sense of self relies heavily on visual information, a whale’s is based primarily on sound.

The oceans have become much noisier over the last century. Busy shipping routes and underwater gas exploration have contributed to what marine scientist Christopher Clark calls “acoustical bleaching” – an intense blanket of noise that drowns out the whales’ voices, preventing them from feeding and communicating.

Whales have been observed hiding behind rocks and moving dangerously close to the shore in an attempt to escape the noise of underwater explosions. Whales living in noisy parts of the ocean are thought to be suffering from chronic noise-induced stress.

WAVES

At Testing Grounds, I feel awash in noise. I had planned to spend most days working here over the residency, but in the end I found I spent most days hiding from the site.

I had noticed the ocean of noise on my first visit, and realised that I would be unable to ignore it or to easily focus on anything else while I was there. Most people I meet appear to have the ability to filter out unnecessary aural information. This is an ability I have never been able to share or to fully comprehend.

I decided that if I could not ignore the noise, I would make it the focus of my work at Testing Grounds. This tactic had worked for me in the past, ameliorating my stress by narrowing my focus.

Yet, despite my best efforts and my lifetime of finely-honed coping strategies, I felt as if I was drowning. I fled home, and I dreaded having to return the next day. The site is as impossible and inaccessible to me as if it were situated on the bottom of the ocean floor.

A SOUND BARRIER

Humans, like whales, experience psychological ill-effects from noise pollution. Noise-induced sleep disturbance can contribute to high blood pressure and mood problems. Noise can impair concentration and increase irritability, having negative effects on people’s interpersonal abilities.

Noises from traffic, aircraft and industry typically come to people’s attention only when they are loud enough to cause a disturbance. These noises are perceived as inherently bad, meaningless, or unproductive. They are an unfortunate by-product that spills out of an otherwise useful device or activity, an excess that we can accept insofar as we can ignore it in favour of more meaningful aural activities.

This is no surprise. These sounds are unpleasant, cacophonous, and unstructured. They have no meaning aside from their undifferentiated excess. They are difficult and worrisome and pointless. They are the offcuts and refuse of something more desirable. It’s hard to love trash.

It’s hard to love trash, but I think trash is still worthy of remark, for no reason other than that it exists. I think it’s worth acting as if the noise is meaningful, even when there is no meaning to be discerned. The noise is audible, and that is more than enough.

REFERENCES

Stansfeld, S. A., & Matheson, M. P. (2003). Noise pollution: non-auditory effects on health. British Medical Bulletin, 68(1), 243-257. doi:10.1093/bmb/ldg033

Jenner, C. (2017, February 15). Too much noise in the ocean for whales’ sensitive ears. The Conversation. Retrieved from http://theconversation.com/too-much-noise-in-the-ocean-for-whales-sensitive-ears-17933

Schiffman, R. (2016, March 31). How Ocean Noise Pollution Wreaks Havoc on Marine Life. Yale Environment 360. Retrieved from http://e360.yale.edu/features/how_ocean_noise_pollution_wreaks_havoc_on_marine_life

February Happenings

Happenings January 31, 2017

WhileTheHourOption1

I have an exciting project coming up in February. I’m part of an artist collective which is dedicated to investigating the nature of time called While the Hour. From February 6 – 24 we’ll be in residency at Testing Grounds as part of the 2017 National Sustainable Living Festival.

We’re running a series of deep time-themed events on the 10th and 11th of February in which you’re invited to draw, write, or simply rest in the fertile state between sleep and wakefulness. We’ll also be working on site to conduct our own investigations into chronosophy.

You can find more information and a full event schedule at whilethehour.wordpress.com or on our Facebook page. You can also book tickets here.

Mental Health Week 2016

Happenings October 5, 2016
b&w pencil drawing of a young woman with cat-like facial features

Image description: Drawing from “Strange stranger.” Black & white pencil drawing of a young, white woman with short blonde hair. The woman’s facial features are half-way between a human’s and a cat’s. She is supporting her head with her left hand (as seen from the viewer’s perspective), and is wearing a black & white zigzag patterned shirt with a grey bow tied at the collar.

This week is mental health week. Mind in Williamstown has organised a pop-up art exhibition of work by people who experience mental illness. The artworks have been installed in various locations around the western suburbs of Melbourne, and you can go and see them until October 15th.

I have a couple of pictures up in Ellie’s Kitchen, 42 Hall Street Newport. The other art locations are:

Sourdough Kitchen, 172 Victoria Street Seddon

Williamstown Library, 84 Ferguson Street Williamstown

Seddon Deadly Sins, 148 Victoria Street Seddon

The Corner Shop, 9 Ballarat Street Yarraville

Yarraville Yoga Centre, 36 Ballarat Street Yarraville

Spotswood Community House, 598 Melbourne Road Spotswood

Tjay’s Cafe, 10c Watton Street Werribe

Mondells Patisserie, 33 Watton Street Werribee

Odd Spot Cafe, 302 Melbourne Road Newport

Sammy’s Bakehouse, 22A Mason Street Newport

The Backyard Est. 2016,  19 Mason Street Newport

Stepping Stone, 27 Schutt Street Newport

Deli Cafe, 45 Challis Street Newport

The Granary Cafe, 2 Devonshire Road Sunshine

Hey Zeus Cafe,  81 Hopkins Street Footscray

Dancing Dog Cafe,  42A Albert Street Footscray

The Atomic Bar,  185 Nelson Place Williamstown

Novel Kitchen,  80 Ferguson Street Williamstown

The Jolly Miller Cafe, T09/100 Overton Road Williams Landing

Pitstop Cafe, 300/302-330 Millers Road Altona North

Runkle Del Rouge, 80 Pier Street Altona

Numero Uno Pizza and Pasta, 20 Pier Street Altona

Laverton Community Centre, 95 Railway Avenue Laverton

Seabrook Community Centre, 15 Truganina Avenue Seabrook